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Jane Seymour

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Birth Name: Joyce Penelope Wilhelmina Frankenberg

Height: 5' 4''

Nationality: British

Birth Date: February 15, 1951

Birth Place: Hillingdon, U.K.

Profession: actress, producer

Husband/Wife: James Keach (actor, director; b. December 7, 1947; married on May 15, 1993), David Flynn (Seymour's business manager; 1981-1992), Geoffrey Planer (businessman; 1977-1978), Michael Attenborough (son of Richard Attenboroug; b.February 13, 1950)

Relationship: Peter Cetera (lead singer of Chicago; born on September 13, 1944; together in 1991)

Claim to fame: as Solitaire in Live and Let Die (1973)

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"Even though I make those movies, I find myself wishing that more of those magic moments could happen in real life."

Nude Filmography:
Filmography at IMDB

Famous T & A ?
Enslavement: The True Story of Fanny Kemble 2000
Matters of the Heart 1990
Túnel, El 1987
Lassiter 1984
Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger 1977

Jane Seymour Posters | Jane Seymour Movies




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Biography:

A multiple Emmy and Golden Globe winner, recipient of the Officer of the British Empire (OBE) in the year 2000, which was bestowed upon her by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace, Jane Seymour has proven her talents in virtually all media, the Broadway stage, motion pictures and television. Her love of art and color has led her to great success as a painter in water colors and oils. In her latest endeavor, Seymour entered into the fashion world through a partnership with Blair Corporation's Crossing Pointe. She has interpreted her artwork in the form of patterns and prints on fabrics for The Jane Seymour Signature Collection exclusively for Crossing Pointe.

Her recent success is that of her nonfiction novel entitled "Two at a Time: A Journey through Twin Pregnancy and Birth." The book already in its third printing just weeks after its initial release was written as a source book for expectant parents of twins. Seymour wrote the book purely for the fact that when she was herself pregnant with twins, there wasn't a guide that explained what she could expect when she was expecting a multiple birth.

Awarded a Golden Globe for her role as "Dr. Quinn," Seymour made history with her six season "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" series, blazing a trail for family-worthy programming to return to series TV. The program fostered such a devoted audience and such a wide audience demand for fulfilling, informative drama that parents could share and enjoy with their children that a national in fact, international, furor was occasioned by the series' cancellation even though it had always won its slot in every season. Her most recent television movie was in fact the second made for TV movie of that canceled series. Dr. Quinn: The Heart Within aired during May Sweeps 2001 in its original timeslot and handily surpassed its Saturday night competition going on to win the ratings war on Saturday night. This again proved the fans' loyalty to Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman, one of the most beloved characters to grace the small screen.

Seymour and husband James Keach have co-authored a series of exceedingly successful children's books entitled "This One and That One" inspired by their highly and delightfully altered life since the actress gave birth to twins in late 1995. Published by Putnam, the books transpose the Keach household into a family of cats whose lives are constantly energized by the antics of their toddler kitty twins, This One and That One. The twins give grey whiskers to their parent cats, Lady Jane and Big Jim.

Seymour has reached success with a star career encompassing international movie stardom with such films as "Somewhere in Time" and "Live and Let Die", Broadway and London stage acclaim including creating the role of Constanza in "Amadeus" in New York and television achievements in such as "Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman" and "East of Eden" in addition to a number of highly-regarded and rated movies and mini-series.

The artist has also emerged as a significant producer of distinguished projects. Through Catfish Productions, she has executed such programs as "Sunstroke" and "A Passion for Justice." The company's recent productions, in which Seymour also starred include "The Absolute Truth", "Black Out", "Yesterday's Children", "Enslavement: The Fanny Kemble Story" for Showtime, "Murder in the Mirror", "Dr. Quinn, The Movie" and "A Marriage of Convenience" all brought both hot reviews and high audience numbers.

Daughter of a British obstetrician and his Dutch wife, Jane was born in Hillingdon, England and raised in Wimbledon. She began training in dance at an early age, and was just thirteen when she made her professional debut with the London Festival Ballet. That same year, she entered the Arts Educational Trust for dance, music and theatre training and danced with the visiting Kirov Ballet at Covent Garden.

After an injury she then turned to acting, dedicating herself to that craft with the same commitment she had given her ballet. Her film debut was as a chorus girl in Richard Attenborough's "Oh, What A Lovely War," which resulted in her being discovered by the top agent in the United Kingdom.

She played roles in a range of classical plays and performed in radio dramas. But it was as Winston Churchill's first love, Pamela Powden, in the Carl Foreman motion picture, "Young Winston," that Jane attracted the attention of top producers.
Her first (and only other) television series was the BBC-TV project, "The Onedin Line," and this led to her casting in the starring role of Solitaire in one of the most popular James Bond films, "Live and Let Die." This attracted Hollywood interest, but Seymour opted to return to the boards of English repertory theatres to tackle such classic leading ladies as Shakespeare's Ophelia and Lady Macbeth, and Ibsen's Nora in "A Doll House."

She returned to film with "Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger," followed by a string of America-bound British television specials including "Frankenstein: The True Story," Dickens' "Our Mutual Friend," and "King David." Able to convey virtually any accent with accuracy, she demonstrated this with her first Hollywood starring role in the six-hour television mini-series, "Captains and Kings." Her portrayal of a proper Bostonian brought her the first of many Emmy nominations.

Jane was soon cast opposite Christopher Reeve in "Somewhere in Time," a favorite romantic film for many. She then starred with Chevy Chase in "Oh! Heavenly Dog," which was followed by the highly acclaimed ABC-TV adaptation of John Steinbeck's "East of Eden," for which she won the Golden Globe Best Actress Award as Cathy/Kate.

On the Broadway stage, she originated the role of Constanza Weber, wife of Mozart in the Broadway hit "Amadeus." Television mini-series also proved to be a favorable medium for Jane's talents. She won recognition for her work in "Jack, The Ripper," and "War and Remembrance," and for the latter, she was nominated on two successive years in the Best Actress category for both the Emmy and Golden Globe Awards.
She won the Emmy Award as Best Actress in a Supporting Role for her portrayal of Maria Callas in ABC-TV's "The Richest Man Alive," based on the life of Aristotle Onassis, and was nominated for a Golden Globe Best Actress Award for her performance as the Duchess of Windsor in the CBS-TV movie "The Woman He Loved."

Actively involved in numerous charitable causes, Jane works for Childhelp USA, a national organization dedicated to the research, treatment and prevention of child abuse, as International Ambassador. The organization's "Woman of the World" award is one of many honors she has won for her social and charitable achievements.

Seymour is also the Honorary Chairperson for City Hearts, an organization that enriches the lives of abused children, inner-city children, and disadvantaged youths, by teaching the performing arts, including painting, dancing and acting. She is, as well, ambassador for children's issues for the film world's charitable arm, Entertainment Industries Foundation/Permanent Charities.

Her talents as a fine artist led to numerous exhibitions across the country and the production of a series of greeting cards sold to support her charities on her website. One of her watercolors was featured on a special "Private Issue" Discover Card, it raised $25,000 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation at a charity auction at the Guggenheim Museum a subsequent painting sold for an additional $20,000. She was also asked to design a special edition bottle for Korbel Champagne, and a silk scarf for Escada, another charitable endeavor. Seymour recently designed sets and costumes for the Houston Ballet's "Five Poems."

She is, additionally, the extremely hands-on mom for twins, John and Kristopher, teen-agers, Sean and Katie, her stepdaughter, Jenni, and stepson, Kalen.

Seymour and Keach reside in Malibu, and together own a 15th century historic manor house near Bath, England which they are dedicated to preserving called St. Catherine's Court.

 

 

Jane Seymour Nude:
Enslavement: The True Story of Fanny Kemble 2000





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